The Facade of National Speed Skating Oval “Ice Ribbon” in Construction for Winter Olympics

Ice Ribbon Olympic

It is estimated that the facade of the National Speed Skating Oval will be completed by this year. It is also now officially released that a total of 42 Winter Olympic projects have started construction including eight new competition venues and five venues under renovation.

When it comes to the National Speed Skating Oval, Chinese citizens would love to address it as “ice ribbon”, the shape of which resembles the skating trails of fast-speed skaters. What we don’t know is that the design has gone through thousands of digital simulations, as well as numerous experimental verifications during the construction period. The underground structure construction of the “ice ribbon” officially started in April 2018. Apart from this, seven other new venues are being built in Beijing and the nearby Yanqing area.

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In terms of renovations, the National Aquatics Center, the National Gymnasium, the Capital Gymnasium and Capital Indoor Stadium Ice Rink have all begun to go through some upgrading and rebuilding. In addition, Cadillac Center (Wukesong Arena) has completed the 6-hour transformation experiment from a basketball ground into an ice rink, and plans to start renovation in 2020. The National Stadium “Bird’s Nest”, which will hold the opening and closing ceremonies for the Winter Olympics and Paralympics, will enter its final stage of transformation in 2021.

In 2019, the facade of the Ice Ribbon will be completed, and a shiny glass curtain wall made up of 22 “ice ribbons” is expected to debut in the Beijing Olympic Park. The 120,000 squaremeters of ice facade will be the largest in Asia. According to China Daily, the construction of ice ribbon has drawn the attention of International Skating Union (ISU).

“I’m sure the athletes will be very fascinated and very happy to be welcomed by such a venue in 2022,” said Tron Espeli from Norway, vice-president of an ISU delegation who visited China last May.

Featured photo credit to China Daily